© 2017 Steve Campsall

phew... the end

So you're now a grammar expert. Well, okay - you know enough for your course!

A word of warning. The grammar of some real-life sentences can cause problems even for those who have studied grammar for years! Real speech and writing, rather than artificially created examples used to teach grammar can be complex and difficult to analyse in detail and with accuracy. Remember the following:

Here is the sentence you have been analysing over the past few web pages. It has been broken down into each of its grammatical elements. Breaking down a sentence grammatically is sometimes called parsing a sentence...


The drunken young man slipped awkwardly into a ditch although he seemed unhurt.

MAIN CLAUSE
The drunken young man slipped awkwardly into a ditch...

subject (S)

verb (V)

adverbials (A)

determiner
(
definite article)

pre-modifier (adjective)

pre-modifier
(adjective)

noun

verb
(
intransitive)

adverb

adverbial phrase

The

drunken

young

man

slipped

awkwardly

into a ditch

noun phrase

verb phrase

SUBORDINATE CLAUSE
...although he seemed unhurt.

subject (S)

verb (V)

complement (C)

subordinating conjunction

pronoun

intransitive finite verb

post-modifier

although

he

seemed

unhurt

 

noun phrase

verb phrase

 

A final and important reminder...

Comment on the grammar within the sentences of a text only if, by doing so, you feel you are commenting on an important aspect of the writer or speaker's stylistic choices relating to genre, context, audience or purpose.

A discussion of grammar for its own sake will gain no marks at all - and it is can be so very boring! Here are just three examples where, for your course, a grammatical analysis could prove very useful.