© 2017 Steve Campsall

sentence structure and function (3)

Now for a little more detail - and as it gets a shade more complex, it surely time for a rest and a nice cuppa first. See you soon!

Declarative sentences
There are several ways to form a declarative sentence depending upon the nature of its main verb. When the main verb needs an object to complete its sense, the structure is said to be SVO. This is the most common sentence structure in the language.

The cat

caught

a mouse

SUBJECT (S)

VERB (V)

OBJECT (O)

Noun phrase

Verb phrase (i.e. also called the predicate)


A few verbs take two objects, and the structure is then SVOO. One object is called 'direct' (the object that directly affected by the verb's action) the other 'indirect' (the object that receives something from the verb's action).

I

gave

Sally

a present

SUBJECT (S)

VERB (V)

OBJECT (O)

OBJECT (O)

 

 

INDIRECT OBJECT (IO)

DIRECT OBJECT (DO)

Noun phrase

Verb phrase


A very few verbs take a complement, and the structure is SVC. A complement acts to give more information about the subject, rather than state who or what was acted upon by the verb.

I

feel

ill

SUBJECT (S)

VERB (V)

COMPLEMENT (C)


Some verbs are complete with only a subject, the structure is SV. These verbs are technically called intransitive.

The animal

died

SUBJECT (S)

VERB (V)

Noun phrase

Verb phrase (or predicate)

Main clause or sentence.

 

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